hrj: (LHMP)
Today's blog features a museum exhibit catalog of the queer history of Boston. I particularly liked all the photographs of women known to have been in "Boston Marriages".

I realize, on posting this, that I completely blew past LHMP entry number 150 without any fanfare. Entry 100 corresponded closely with the release of The Mystic Marriage and I used it as an opportunity for a promotional giveaway. Depending on how many multi-blog publications I cover in the next year or so, I suppose it's possible that entry 200 might provide an opportunity to do a cross-promotion with the next Alpennia novel, Floodtide, although there's nothing even faintly resembling a projected finish date for it. My LHMP publication spreadsheet currently has about 400 titles. I suppose it's possible that I'll eventually be celebrating an Entry 500. Who knows? But let's keep our sights on more immediate goals: what sort of celebratory event should I plan for LHMP #200?

hrj: (Default)

I'm not going to lie: I'm feeling a bit anxious about the reception of this week's podcast. The topic of how erotic desire has been handled with respect to the history of lesbians has the potential for hurtful erasure on every side. Some scholars have approached the history of sexuality from a position that erotic desire and erotic activity are how you define the presence of lesbianism. Even aside from the way in which an eagerness to "claim women for the L team" tends to erase bisexual identity, using sexual activity and sexual desire between women as the sine qua non of lesbian identity erases those for whom romantic attachment, rather than sex, is the key factor. (Although it does encompass aromantic women who enjoy erotic attraction to women.)

In this episode, I look at the patterns of history, not through the question of "how did specific women experience homoerotic and homoromantic attraction?" but through the lens of cultural archetypes. What were some of the prominent cultural archetypes that combined romantic bonds between women with an absence of the expectation of sexual activity? I'll be very curious to hear what people think.

Listen to the podcast here at the Lesbian Talk Show site, or subscribe through your favorite podcast aggregator, such as iTunes, Podbean, or Stitcher.

hrj: (LHMP)
 I'm going back to my more usual pattern of covering thick books one chapter at a time! Velasco will take care of almost two months worth of entries, which will give me some breathing space during my summer travels.
hrj: (Default)
I'm doing a pair of podcast episodes on both Sappho the historic woman, and Sappho the legend and icon, including a tour through how her poetry was received and translated over time. I'd love for folks to support the existence of this show (part of The Lesbian Talk Show) with downloads and show feedback. Show my podcast host that people are clamoring for more stories of women-loving-women taken from the pages of history books.

Here's the current episode link.


And here's a page with links to all the past shows, so you can catch up.

I don't do the podcast for fame and fortune--I do it for love. It would be cool to get some love back. Subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast feed (such as iTunes, Podbean, or Stitcher) and it would be fabulous if you left a rating and review specifically mentioning how much you enjoy the history podcast.

Profile

hrj: (Default)
hrj

October 2017

S M T W T F S
12345 67
8 9 10 1112 1314
1516 1718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 20th, 2017 08:59 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios